When Human Rights Laws Help - and Hurt - Asylum Seekers: A Comparison of Canadian and U.S. Jurisprudence

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When Human Rights Laws Help - and Hurt - Asylum Seekers: A Comparison of Canadian and U.S. Jurisprudence

Monday, 19 November 2012 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm
Venue: 
Fellows’ Dining Room, Hilda Besse Building, St Antony’s College
Speaker(s): 
Stephen Meili (University of Minnesota)
Convenor: 
Dr Halbert Jones
Series: 
North American Studies Seminar Series

Professor Stephen Meili is the Supervising Attorney in the Minnesota University Law School's Immigration and Human Rights Clinic, where students represent asylum-seekers and detained individuals in U.S. Immigration Court and the Board of Immigration Appeals. His teaching interests include immigration law, civil procedure, consumer law, and practice and professionalism.

Professor Meili's research interests complement his clinical teaching. His current project is a study of the impact of international human rights treaties on asylum law jurisprudence and practice in five common law countries (Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States). The study includes reviewing and coding more than 60,000 asylum decisions, and interviewing lawyers representing asylum-seekers. Since January 2012, he has presented preliminary findings from his research at conferences sponsored by the University of London, Osgoode Hall Law School of York University, and the Law and Society Association.

Professor Meili has been appointed an Academic Visitor at the Faculty of Law and a Senior Associate Member of St. Antony's College at the University of Oxford.