Sacralizing cinema: the timing of recent Russian film premieres

Sacralizing cinema: the timing of recent Russian film premieres

Monday, 27 April 2015 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm
Venue: 
Nissan Lecture Theatre
Speaker(s): 
Natascha Drubek (Freie Universität Berlin)
Convenor: 
Oliver Ready (St Antony's)
Series: 
Russian and Eurasian Studies Centre Monday Seminar

In recent years several Russian films were produced which in one way or another have close connections to the Russian Orthodox Church. There is for example the film "The Priest" (2009), which addresses the difficult topic of the so called “Pskov Mission” during World War II. The initiative for making a film about priests and religious life under Nazi occupation came from the Russian Orthodox Church itself, which to this effect had formed a production unit inside its research centre “Orthodox Encyclopedia”. Another connecting point between film and Orthodoxy can be found in the careful timing of premieres of films which are deemed valuable for Church and State. The latter inversely applies to postponing or forbidding films which could offend religious or patriotic feelings during church or state holidays. This goes for domestic productions such as "Leviathan" (2014) or foreign films. The release of the American "Child 44" was cancelled in April 2015 by its Russian distributor, as its depiction of Russia was considered unsuitable for Russian audiences on the eve of the 70th anniversary of the Great Patriotic War.

This is an advanced seminar series supported by the Management Committee of Russian and East European Studies and the Harry Shukman Seminar Fund (created in Harry's memory by Fay and Geoffrey Elliott). All are welcome.